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[OT} Puzzle thats driving us nuts



 
 
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  #1  
Old December 29th 04, 11:23 PM
Denise VanDyke
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Yowie wrote:
For Christmas, my parents were given a Mensa calender with a puzzle for each
day. They haven't opened it yet, but the sample question was:

A toy shop prices toys on the whim of the owner:
A doll is $12, a kite $15, a skateboard $34, and a ring toss $24. How much
is a blackboard?

My whole family has been working furiously on this puzzle, but even though
we know the answer (it was printed on the box) we have no idea *why* $31
right

Can anyone out there in RPCA land explain the solution? It will save the
Greater Chapman Clan from going utterly bonkers.

Yowie

I can't wait to hear explanations for this one. Personally, my thoughts
are a)that it says "on the whim", therefore one would not expect a
pattern, and b) because the owner said? ;-)

- Denise Brennasmeowmy


  #2  
Old December 29th 04, 11:28 PM
Yowie
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Default [OT} Puzzle thats driving us nuts

For Christmas, my parents were given a Mensa calender with a puzzle for each
day. They haven't opened it yet, but the sample question was:

A toy shop prices toys on the whim of the owner:
A doll is $12, a kite $15, a skateboard $34, and a ring toss $24. How much
is a blackboard?

My whole family has been working furiously on this puzzle, but even though
we know the answer (it was printed on the box) we have no idea *why* $31
right

Can anyone out there in RPCA land explain the solution? It will save the
Greater Chapman Clan from going utterly bonkers.

Yowie


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  #3  
Old December 29th 04, 11:44 PM
CK
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Yowie wrote:
For Christmas, my parents were given a Mensa calender with a puzzle for each
day. They haven't opened it yet, but the sample question was:

A toy shop prices toys on the whim of the owner:
A doll is $12, a kite $15, a skateboard $34, and a ring toss $24. How much
is a blackboard?

My whole family has been working furiously on this puzzle, but even though
we know the answer (it was printed on the box) we have no idea *why* $31
right

Can anyone out there in RPCA land explain the solution? It will save the
Greater Chapman Clan from going utterly bonkers.

Yowie


By putting a piece of the puzzle into Google I got the following
suggestion for a solution:

QUOTE
It could be based on the vowels in the words.
dOll = $12 implies O = $12
rIng tOss = $24 implies I = $12
kItE = $15 implies E = $3
blAckbOArd = skAtEbOArd - E = $34 - $3 = $31
UNQUOTE

Source:
http://www.able2know.com/forums/about41755.html

--
Christine in Vantaa, Finland
christal63 (at) yahoo (dot) com
photos: http://photos.yahoo.com/christal63
  #4  
Old December 29th 04, 11:50 PM
Brigitte
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"Yowie" wrote in message
...
For Christmas, my parents were given a Mensa calender with a puzzle for

each
day. They haven't opened it yet, but the sample question was:

A toy shop prices toys on the whim of the owner:
A doll is $12, a kite $15, a skateboard $34, and a ring toss $24. How much
is a blackboard?

My whole family has been working furiously on this puzzle, but even though
we know the answer (it was printed on the box) we have no idea *why* $31
right

Can anyone out there in RPCA land explain the solution? It will save the
Greater Chapman Clan from going utterly bonkers.

Yowie


---
Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
Version: 6.0.799 / Virus Database: 543 - Release Date: 20/11/04


You might try posting this question at alt.mensa

Brigitte


  #5  
Old December 29th 04, 11:51 PM
Monique Y. Mudama
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On 2004-12-29, Denise VanDyke penned:

I can't wait to hear explanations for this one. Personally, my thoughts are
a)that it says "on the whim", therefore one would not expect a pattern, and
b) because the owner said? ;-)


One can have a whimsical pattern!

--
monique, who is sometimes allowed to pet Oscar, a grey^H^H^H^Hblue-cream DLH
with an attitude!

  #6  
Old December 30th 04, 12:05 AM
Monique Y. Mudama
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On 2004-12-29, CK penned:

By putting a piece of the puzzle into Google I got the following suggestion
for a solution:

QUOTE It could be based on the vowels in the words. dOll = $12 implies O =
$12 rIng tOss = $24 implies I = $12 kItE = $15 implies E = $3 blAckbOArd =
skAtEbOArd - E = $34 - $3 = $31 UNQUOTE

Source: http://www.able2know.com/forums/about41755.html


What I don't get is why this sort of thing is supposed to be a test of
intelligence. It's a lot like those pop quizzes they like to throw you at
interviews. You might be able to determine intelligence/creativity by seeing
how many possible approaches a person tries, and whether they intelligently
reject the poor ones, but you can't judge intelligence by whether or not they
stumble onto this particular approach!

Bah!

I thought about number of letters, and I thought about scoring based on height
above ground at which the item was used, and a few other things ... but I
didn't stumble on the vowel thing, it's true.

Can you tell I don't do well on these sorts of things and have a chip on my
shoulder about them? Heh.

--
monique, who is sometimes allowed to pet Oscar, a grey^H^H^H^Hblue-cream DLH
with an attitude!

  #7  
Old December 30th 04, 12:21 AM
Yoj
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"Monique Y. Mudama" wrote in message
...
On 2004-12-29, CK penned:

By putting a piece of the puzzle into Google I got the following

suggestion
for a solution:

QUOTE It could be based on the vowels in the words. dOll = $12 implies

O =
$12 rIng tOss = $24 implies I = $12 kItE = $15 implies E = $3 blAckbOArd

=
skAtEbOArd - E = $34 - $3 = $31 UNQUOTE

Source: http://www.able2know.com/forums/about41755.html


What I don't get is why this sort of thing is supposed to be a test of
intelligence. It's a lot like those pop quizzes they like to throw you at
interviews. You might be able to determine intelligence/creativity by

seeing
how many possible approaches a person tries, and whether they

intelligently
reject the poor ones, but you can't judge intelligence by whether or not

they
stumble onto this particular approach!

Bah!

I thought about number of letters, and I thought about scoring based on

height
above ground at which the item was used, and a few other things ... but I
didn't stumble on the vowel thing, it's true.

Can you tell I don't do well on these sorts of things and have a chip on

my
shoulder about them? Heh.

--
monique, who is sometimes allowed to pet Oscar, a grey^H^H^H^Hblue-cream

DLH
with an attitude!


I didn't figure it out either, and I've been a member of Mensa for many
years. I don't know what my reading speed is, but I do read fast, so that
probably contributed to my score. Also, people who read a lot are more
likely to know the answers to some of the questions.

For many years I was a closet Mensan. I didn't mention my membership to
anybody, because many people don't know what Mensa is. How do you explain
that without souding boastful? I finally realized that I know many
brilliant, talented people who wouldn't qualify for Mensa. My Dad, for
instance, was probably the smartest person I've ever known, but he was a
very slow reader. I also realized that IQ tests don't check for
imagination, ingenuity, common sense or various types of talent. Not only
that, I know many Mensans who have very poor people skills, and some with
rather odd personality quirks. A Mensan I knew was killed when the
ceiling-high stacks of newspapers in his house fell on him and crushed him.

Now if I mention a Mensa event and somebody asks, "What is Mensa?" I say,
"It's an organization for people who are good at taking IQ tests. As far as
I'm concerned. that's all those tests prove - how good you are at taking
that kind of test. I know highly intelligent people who freeze up when they
have to take any kind of tests. I enjoy doing various word puzzles, and
look at IQ tests as fun, similar to a puzzle. My good score on an IQ test
doesn't prove I'm smarter than you or someone else in ways that matter much
more than taking tests.

Joy


  #8  
Old December 30th 04, 12:54 AM
CatNipped
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Default

"Yoj" wrote in message
...

I didn't figure it out either, and I've been a member of Mensa for many
years. I don't know what my reading speed is, but I do read fast, so that
probably contributed to my score. Also, people who read a lot are more
likely to know the answers to some of the questions.


Me too! Joy, what local chapter are you with? I'm with Gulf Coast Mensa -
in fact, I'm their webmaster (http://www.gcmensa.org/).

For many years I was a closet Mensan. I didn't mention my membership to
anybody, because many people don't know what Mensa is. How do you explain
that without souding boastful?


Me too! I fear that people will ask if I cheated on the test! I've done
such *INCREDIBLY* stupid things in my life (not the least of which was my
first husband!!).

I finally realized that I know many
brilliant, talented people who wouldn't qualify for Mensa.


Me too!

My Dad, for
instance, was probably the smartest person I've ever known, but he was a
very slow reader. I also realized that IQ tests don't check for
imagination, ingenuity, common sense or various types of talent. Not only
that, I know many Mensans who have very poor people skills, and some with
rather odd personality quirks. A Mensan I knew was killed when the
ceiling-high stacks of newspapers in his house fell on him and crushed

him.

LOL. I was once at a Mensa Party at a member's house and we were sitting
beside the pool watching as three guys were setting up a standing lamp since
it was getting dark out. My friend looked over and commented, "Hmmm, three
Mensans, an electrical appliance, and a large body of water. Should I call
911 now to save time later?"

Now if I mention a Mensa event and somebody asks, "What is Mensa?" I say,
"It's an organization for people who are good at taking IQ tests.


Me too!!! (Gee, isn't this a stimulating, brillian, scintillating
conversation??!!

As far as
I'm concerned. that's all those tests prove - how good you are at taking
that kind of test. I know highly intelligent people who freeze up when

they
have to take any kind of tests. I enjoy doing various word puzzles, and
look at IQ tests as fun, similar to a puzzle. My good score on an IQ test
doesn't prove I'm smarter than you or someone else in ways that matter

much
more than taking tests.


That says it all!!!

Hugs,

CatNipped

Joy




  #9  
Old December 30th 04, 02:46 AM
Yowie
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Posts: n/a
Default

"Yoj" wrote in message
...
"Monique Y. Mudama" wrote in message
...
On 2004-12-29, CK penned:

By putting a piece of the puzzle into Google I got the following

suggestion
for a solution:

QUOTE It could be based on the vowels in the words. dOll = $12

implies
O =
$12 rIng tOss = $24 implies I = $12 kItE = $15 implies E = $3

blAckbOArd
=
skAtEbOArd - E = $34 - $3 = $31 UNQUOTE

Source: http://www.able2know.com/forums/about41755.html


What I don't get is why this sort of thing is supposed to be a test of
intelligence. It's a lot like those pop quizzes they like to throw you

at
interviews. You might be able to determine intelligence/creativity by

seeing
how many possible approaches a person tries, and whether they

intelligently
reject the poor ones, but you can't judge intelligence by whether or not

they
stumble onto this particular approach!

Bah!

I thought about number of letters, and I thought about scoring based on

height
above ground at which the item was used, and a few other things ... but

I
didn't stumble on the vowel thing, it's true.

Can you tell I don't do well on these sorts of things and have a chip on

my
shoulder about them? Heh.

--
monique, who is sometimes allowed to pet Oscar, a grey^H^H^H^Hblue-cream

DLH
with an attitude!


I didn't figure it out either, and I've been a member of Mensa for many
years. I don't know what my reading speed is, but I do read fast, so that
probably contributed to my score. Also, people who read a lot are more
likely to know the answers to some of the questions.

For many years I was a closet Mensan. I didn't mention my membership to
anybody, because many people don't know what Mensa is. How do you explain
that without souding boastful? I finally realized that I know many
brilliant, talented people who wouldn't qualify for Mensa. My Dad, for
instance, was probably the smartest person I've ever known, but he was a
very slow reader. I also realized that IQ tests don't check for
imagination, ingenuity, common sense or various types of talent. Not only
that, I know many Mensans who have very poor people skills, and some with
rather odd personality quirks. A Mensan I knew was killed when the
ceiling-high stacks of newspapers in his house fell on him and crushed

him.

My sister tells the story from her work - 5 radiologist/oncologists, all
with PhDs and many years experience, plus her, the technician, fresh out of
highschool. She was always called to cut the cake, as none of the other 5
could figure out how to cut it properly so everyone got the same sized
slice. When my sister said to start by cutting the cake in half - they did.
And then they had two much thinner round cakes and still none the wiser.

My old boss (who is a great bloke when he's not being the boss) says that
the place I work is a "sheltered workshop for the gifted". I am one of the
least educated there, most people have PhDs, and a goodly portion of my
colleagues are what the English would politely call "eccentric". Oh, they
are are *brilliant* all right, the IQs would be off scale, and they know all
there is to know about their specialisation, but most of 'em don't have a
*clue* about the outside world. Only in a sheltered workshop for the gifted
would a man who insists on doing animal impersonations before and after he
talks to you would be tolerated. Or a man who will happily tell you anything
you could ever think of about the London Underground and keeps cpoious notes
on every single train he has ever seen (logged to the *second*). Another
talks to himself *all* the time, you can happily eavesdrop on his entire
thought process if you can keep up (I can't). My current boss is an utter
literalist, so you have to be careful to say exactly what you mean, or he'll
get confused. Me, I'm just as nuts, there's cat paraphenalia all over my
office, and I meow at the guy who does animal impersonations and we have
proper conversations in Cattish. And everyone takes this as perfectly
normal. And its always a big shock when I start reading the internal work
newsgroup and discover just how - errr - how different the folks out on the
production line are to the people I usually work with. I guess if we can put
up with the Train mad person, The Animal Impersonator, the Mad Cat Lady, The
Guy That Must Whistle In the Corridor and the rest of the eccentricities in
tbe building, we are a very tolerant and accepting lot. And if I throw in
you here in RPCA, and the rest of the people I hang out with, it always
comes as a bit of a surprise and shock that not everybody on this planet are
as tolerant and accepting as the people I spend my life with.

Yowie


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  #10  
Old December 30th 04, 03:01 AM
Seanette Blaylock
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"CatNipped" had some very interesting things
to say about [OT} Puzzle thats driving us nuts:

LOL. I was once at a Mensa Party at a member's house and we were sitting
beside the pool watching as three guys were setting up a standing lamp since
it was getting dark out. My friend looked over and commented, "Hmmm, three
Mensans, an electrical appliance, and a large body of water. Should I call
911 now to save time later?"


[snicker] At least they weren't using liquid oxygen to jumpstart a
barbecue grill. :-)

--
"The universe is quite robust in design and appears to be
doing just fine on its own, incompetent support staff notwithstanding.
:-)" - the Dennis formerly known as (evil), MCFL
 




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