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ACL tear



 
 
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  #1  
Old May 3rd 05, 02:40 PM
Janet B
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Default ACL tear

Has anyone had to deal with this with a cat? For a variety of
reasons, I'm not opting for surgery for Carey (bone thin tortie with a
myriad of other issues). "Rest" is advised, and we seem to be able to
prevent most jumping fairly easily (she's almost 12, not a kitten,
which helps!).

Anyway, would like to hear from anyone who's experienced this, what
your choice for treatment has been, and the outcome.

--
Janet B
www.bestfriendsdogobedience.com
http://pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/bestfr...bedience/album
  #2  
Old May 3rd 05, 07:14 PM
William Hamblen
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On Tue, 03 May 2005 09:40:29 -0400, Janet B
wrote:

Has anyone had to deal with this with a cat? For a variety of
reasons, I'm not opting for surgery for Carey (bone thin tortie with a
myriad of other issues). "Rest" is advised, and we seem to be able to
prevent most jumping fairly easily (she's almost 12, not a kitten,
which helps!).


My Spotsie suffered an injury to one of her stifles. Physical
examination showed damage to ligaments and x-rays showed one of the
tiny bones that anchor the ligament was displaced. The vet and I
talked about orthopedic surgery - large dogs sometimes get the same
sort of injury and need surgery to prevent lameness - and decided to
wait and see how cage rest worked before doing any operation. She
recovered function fairly quickly. The outcome was that the cat still
can jump to the kitchen windowsill. The explanation is that there is
less strain on the limb in an 8 pound cat than there is in an 80 pound
dog.

  #3  
Old May 3rd 05, 07:21 PM
Janet B
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Default

On Tue, 03 May 2005 13:14:26 -0500, William Hamblen
wrote:

The explanation is that there is
less strain on the limb in an 8 pound cat than there is in an 80 pound
dog.



Thanks. She's only about 6.5# so very little strain! She's doing
well resting without a cage so far, so I'm hoping we don't need to go
that route, but will if we need to.

--
Janet B
www.bestfriendsdogobedience.com
http://pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/bestfr...bedience/album
  #4  
Old May 4th 05, 01:07 AM
blueberries79
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Default


"Janet B" wrote in message
...
Has anyone had to deal with this with a cat? For a variety of
reasons, I'm not opting for surgery for Carey (bone thin tortie with a
myriad of other issues). "Rest" is advised, and we seem to be able to
prevent most jumping fairly easily (she's almost 12, not a kitten,
which helps!).

Anyway, would like to hear from anyone who's experienced this, what
your choice for treatment has been, and the outcome.

--
Janet B
www.bestfriendsdogobedience.com
http://pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/bestfr...bedience/album


Obviously there is a huge difference between a cat and a human, but when I
tore (clean through) my ACL 10 years ago, the doctor actually gave me the
option of not having surgery. He said if I wasn't going to be a very active
person, then I could actually live a normal life without going through it as
the main reason the ACL is there is to keep the shin bone in the correct
place next to the knee cap. If you aren't going to be running hard and
stopping, then you would be alright. I have no idea how the difference
would be for a cat because of the difference in leg structures, and there is
no way to tell a cat not to run and stop hard, but its still another 2 cents
to throw in : )



  #5  
Old May 4th 05, 01:15 AM
Janet B
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Default

On Tue, 3 May 2005 20:07:43 -0400, "blueberries79"
wrote:

I have no idea how the difference
would be for a cat because of the difference in leg structures, and there is
no way to tell a cat not to run and stop hard, but its still another 2 cents
to throw in : )



LOL - thanks! She's almost 12 and relatively sedate when she's not
racing around with the 3 year old cat, so hopefully......


--
Janet B
www.bestfriendsdogobedience.com
http://pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/bestfr...bedience/album
 




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