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Repellent: Methyl Nonyl Ketone?



 
 
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  #1  
Old October 25th 05, 12:52 AM
Juls
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Default Repellent: Methyl Nonyl Ketone?

I'm getting ready to order one of those laser mice toys from Drs.
Foster and Smith (our Pet Smart is out of stock until the holidays) and
am tempted to order some of that spray cat repellent that contains
Methyl Nonyl Ketone. They have a can for about five dollars.

Has anyone used this, does it work, and is it safe?

I've got a couple of spots I'm trying to keep Jazz out of, like behind
the TV where the electrical and cable wires are. She thinks the wires
are great fun, and I can't come up with a way to make a barricade. I've
tried to distract her with other things, including a cheap cat tree
from Wal Mart (that is being returned, in favor of one I'll probably
have to make myself). But once she zeroes in on something, there's just
no stopping her.

So I was wondering about this stuff you spray. Oh, I read somewhere
online that cats hate lavender, and I've got tons of it outside...both
cats loved it and drug it around everywhere. I've also read about
vinegar, but being so close to electrical stuff, I'm afraid she'd see
it and immediately dive in.

Thanks, Juls

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  #2  
Old October 25th 05, 01:02 AM
No More Retail
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Default Repellent: Methyl Nonyl Ketone?

Archive-name: cats-faq/behavior
URL: http://www.fanciers.com/cat-faqs/behavior.html
Last-modified: 16 Jul 1999

=======
The latest versions of these FAQ's may be obtained via the Web at
http://www.fanciers.com/cat-faqs/

The multiple posted (ASCII) parts of the FAQ are all archived at
rtfm.mit.edu
(18.181.0.24) in the directory /pub/usenet/news.answers/cats-faq. These
files will also appear in other sites that mirror the RTFM archives.
==========


Problem Behaviors in Cats

Note: Please see the [1]Table of Contents FAQ for a complete list of
topics.

Cord (and Other) Chewing

Put something distasteful on the cord to discourage chewing.
Substances to try: tabasco sauce, cayenne pepper, Bitter Apple/Orange,
nail-biting nailpolish, orange/lemon peel. If you cannot find a
substance that will repel your cat, you may wish to use gaffer's tape
to secure exposed cords. Gaffer's tape comes in a variety of colors
and you will probably be able to find something relatively
inconspicuous. (Duct tape can also be used, but it's pretty messy and
hard to clean up if you're moving out of an apartment. Consider
permanent wiring if you own your place: installment behind walls, etc.

This will work on other chewed items, as well, although you will need
to check the compatibility of the chewed item with the substance you
put on it.
__________________________________________________ _______________


  #3  
Old October 25th 05, 01:54 AM
Joe Canuck
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Repellent: Methyl Nonyl Ketone?

Juls wrote:

I'm getting ready to order one of those laser mice toys from Drs.
Foster and Smith (our Pet Smart is out of stock until the holidays) and
am tempted to order some of that spray cat repellent that contains
Methyl Nonyl Ketone. They have a can for about five dollars.

Has anyone used this, does it work, and is it safe?

I've got a couple of spots I'm trying to keep Jazz out of, like behind
the TV where the electrical and cable wires are. She thinks the wires
are great fun, and I can't come up with a way to make a barricade. I've
tried to distract her with other things, including a cheap cat tree
from Wal Mart (that is being returned, in favor of one I'll probably
have to make myself). But once she zeroes in on something, there's just
no stopping her.

So I was wondering about this stuff you spray. Oh, I read somewhere
online that cats hate lavender, and I've got tons of it outside...both
cats loved it and drug it around everywhere. I've also read about
vinegar, but being so close to electrical stuff, I'm afraid she'd see
it and immediately dive in.

Thanks, Juls


Methyl Nonyl Ketone is considered a pesticide.

My cat loves to chew on cables, but I would not consider using this
stuff to keep her away from them.

I have spent a lot of time engaged in cable management to minimize or
eliminate the exposure. Providing alternatives, such as straws, works
well with my cat. She loves to chew on straws so I always leave a few on
the floor.
  #4  
Old October 25th 05, 01:55 AM
No More Retail
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Posts: n/a
Default Repellent: Methyl Nonyl Ketone?

What is a straw I have seen one in my house since 1982


  #5  
Old October 25th 05, 02:07 AM
Juls
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Posts: n/a
Default Repellent: Methyl Nonyl Ketone?

Wow, I'd never seen this FAQ before...some interesting tips there. (But
many aren't helpful for a deaf cat, who can't hear a shaking can of
coins)

I've tried a little squirt gun on her, but I think she likes it.

With the big diffenbachia I had, that needed to be brought inside for
winter, I finally had to move it to the basement today. (They don't go
in the basement) The foil did a good job in stopping her digging, but
then she got mad and started trying to climb it. She broke off about
half the leaves and I couldn't find a place to put it where she'd leave
it alone. I put the shamrocks down there too...she thought they were
delicious. Dmitri used to think the same, and once ate an entire plant
before I caught him. They just love those shamrocks! Oh, and the spider
plants, too, but those I've been able to hide from her by putting them
on top of a high bookshelf and hiding the many baby spiders behind the
plant. I also got them a new grass plant, but they always seem to lose
interest in that after the first day. Jack doesn't bother the other
plants.

I'll try the tabasco sauce, but I'm still wondering if this product
being sold is effective and safe. They have it at Pet Smart too, but
was three times the price as this can at Drs. F&S.

In article , "No More
Retail" wrote:

Archive-name: cats-faq/behavior
URL: http://www.fanciers.com/cat-faqs/behavior.html
Last-modified: 16 Jul 1999

=======
The latest versions of these FAQ's may be obtained via the Web at
http://www.fanciers.com/cat-faqs/

The multiple posted (ASCII) parts of the FAQ are all archived at
rtfm.mit.edu
(18.181.0.24) in the directory /pub/usenet/news.answers/cats-faq. These
files will also appear in other sites that mirror the RTFM archives.
==========


Problem Behaviors in Cats

Note: Please see the [1]Table of Contents FAQ for a complete list of
topics.

Cord (and Other) Chewing

Put something distasteful on the cord to discourage chewing.
Substances to try: tabasco sauce, cayenne pepper, Bitter Apple/Orange,
nail-biting nailpolish, orange/lemon peel. If you cannot find a
substance that will repel your cat, you may wish to use gaffer's tape
to secure exposed cords. Gaffer's tape comes in a variety of colors
and you will probably be able to find something relatively
inconspicuous. (Duct tape can also be used, but it's pretty messy and
hard to clean up if you're moving out of an apartment. Consider
permanent wiring if you own your place: installment behind walls, etc.

This will work on other chewed items, as well, although you will need
to check the compatibility of the chewed item with the substance you
put on it.
__________________________________________________ _______________


--
To email (remove annoying hyphens)

j-u-l-i
at
e-c-t-dot-o-r-g
  #6  
Old October 25th 05, 02:24 AM
Juls
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Repellent: Methyl Nonyl Ketone?

In article , Joe Canuck
wrote:

Methyl Nonyl Ketone is considered a pesticide.


Okay, thanks. That answers my question...I'll do alternatives.

WTF are they selling it if it's a pesticide??? That sucks.

I was tempted to try little paper plates sprinkled with this stuff I
used on my garden to keep rabbits out. It's made from coyote urine.
LOL. (It doesn't really stink unless you stick your face in it, then
there's a slight odor) Good stuff, but it ran all the rabbits
completely away. I just didn't want them to eat my garden, but I
enjoyed watching them frolic in the yard.

--
To email (remove annoying hyphens)

j-u-l-i
at
e-c-t-dot-o-r-g
  #7  
Old October 25th 05, 02:33 AM
Phil P.
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Repellent: Methyl Nonyl Ketone?


"Juls" wrote in message
...


I've got a couple of spots I'm trying to keep Jazz out of, like behind
the TV where the electrical and cable wires are. She thinks the wires
are great fun, and I can't come up with a way to make a barricade.


Juls,

Go to an automotive supply store and buy a few yards of vacuum hosing- it
comes on a roll (very flexible) and in a variety of inside diameters from
1/8" to about 1". Cut the hosing in the lengths of the wires; cut a slit
down the length of the hosing and put the wires inside.

You can also use plastic tubing that you can buy a Home Depot, but I prefer
vacuum hosing because the hoses are very strong and walls of the hosing are
very thick- thicker than the length of a cat's carnassial teeth. Vacuum
hosing is very inexpensive and very easy to work with- its so flexible that
you can even tie it into a tight knot.

Phil



  #8  
Old October 25th 05, 03:39 AM
Juls
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Repellent: Methyl Nonyl Ketone?

In article , "Phil P."
wrote:

"Juls" wrote in message
...


I've got a couple of spots I'm trying to keep Jazz out of, like behind
the TV where the electrical and cable wires are. She thinks the wires
are great fun, and I can't come up with a way to make a barricade.


Juls,

Go to an automotive supply store and buy a few yards of vacuum hosing- it
comes on a roll (very flexible) and in a variety of inside diameters from
1/8" to about 1". Cut the hosing in the lengths of the wires; cut a slit
down the length of the hosing and put the wires inside.

You can also use plastic tubing that you can buy a Home Depot, but I prefer
vacuum hosing because the hoses are very strong and walls of the hosing are
very thick- thicker than the length of a cat's carnassial teeth. Vacuum
hosing is very inexpensive and very easy to work with- its so flexible that
you can even tie it into a tight knot.

Phil


Oh wow, that's a great idea. I could do the same with computer cables,
too.

Any ideas for the space between the wall and the fridge? I tried a
piece of cardboard to fit, and she tore it down pretty quickly. For
some reason, she likes to sleep *behind* the refrigerator. It took me a
long time to figure out where she was hiding when she would disappear.
I knew she was sleeping somewhere, but hadn't thought of behind the
fridge until I heard her coming out one day...and there she came. When
she disappears, now I can go to the kitchen and jump up and down really
hard on the floor and the vibrations wake her, but it's not a place I
want her to be.


--
To email (remove annoying hyphens)

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at
e-c-t-dot-o-r-g
  #9  
Old October 25th 05, 04:58 AM
Phil P.
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Repellent: Methyl Nonyl Ketone?


"Juls" wrote in message
...
In article , "Phil P."
wrote:

"Juls" wrote in message
...


I've got a couple of spots I'm trying to keep Jazz out of, like behind
the TV where the electrical and cable wires are. She thinks the wires
are great fun, and I can't come up with a way to make a barricade.


Juls,

Go to an automotive supply store and buy a few yards of vacuum hosing-

it
comes on a roll (very flexible) and in a variety of inside diameters

from
1/8" to about 1". Cut the hosing in the lengths of the wires; cut a

slit
down the length of the hosing and put the wires inside.

You can also use plastic tubing that you can buy a Home Depot, but I

prefer
vacuum hosing because the hoses are very strong and walls of the hosing

are
very thick- thicker than the length of a cat's carnassial teeth. Vacuum
hosing is very inexpensive and very easy to work with- its so flexible

that
you can even tie it into a tight knot.

Phil


Oh wow, that's a great idea. I could do the same with computer cables,
too.



The best part about using vacuum hosing or tubing is you don't have to
disconnect all the wires. After you make the slit, just slide the hosing
over the wires. You can also put several wires inside one hose if the wires
go to the same place.


Any ideas for the space between the wall and the fridge? I tried a
piece of cardboard to fit,


You shouldn't block the space behind the fridge with a solid object because
it will also restrict air flow and cause the fridge motor to overheat and
possibly burn out.

While you're at home depot, buy a 4'H x 10L' roll of metal fencing (similar
to chicken wire) that has 1/2" square openings- they're too small for a
cat's paws to get stuck in. Don't unroll the fencing- just stand it up and
wedge it between the wall and the fridge- do the other of the side of fridge
the same way. The fencing will keep the cats out while still allowing air to
circulate behind the fridge. The rolls are hardly noticeable.

Some fencing comes wrapped in plastic packages. In this case, peel down a
few inches of the package and put a few layers of tape around the roll-
about an inch or two from the top of the roll so it doesn't unwind. Do the
same
on the other end. After both ends are taped, take the rest of the plastic
packaging off and wrap a few layers of tape around the middle of the roll.
Now the roll won't unwind. Wedge it between the wall and fridge. That ought
to do it.

Phil




  #10  
Old October 25th 05, 06:50 AM
Juls
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Repellent: Methyl Nonyl Ketone?

In article , "Phil P."
wrote:

You shouldn't block the space behind the fridge with a solid object because
it will also restrict air flow and cause the fridge motor to overheat and
possibly burn out.

While you're at home depot, buy a 4'H x 10L' roll of metal fencing (similar
to chicken wire) that has 1/2" square openings- they're too small for a
cat's paws to get stuck in. Don't unroll the fencing- just stand it up and
wedge it between the wall and the fridge- do the other of the side of fridge
the same way. The fencing will keep the cats out while still allowing air to
circulate behind the fridge. The rolls are hardly noticeable.

Some fencing comes wrapped in plastic packages. In this case, peel down a
few inches of the package and put a few layers of tape around the roll-
about an inch or two from the top of the roll so it doesn't unwind. Do the
same
on the other end. After both ends are taped, take the rest of the plastic
packaging off and wrap a few layers of tape around the middle of the roll.
Now the roll won't unwind. Wedge it between the wall and fridge. That ought
to do it.


Fantastic! Thank you.

Now, could you come over and build me a custom cat tree??

--
To email (remove annoying hyphens)

j-u-l-i
at
e-c-t-dot-o-r-g
 




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