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Nipsy drags his butt across the floor



 
 
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  #1  
Old February 6th 08, 01:23 PM posted to rec.pets.cats.health+behav
dgk
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,241
Default Nipsy drags his butt across the floor

I noticed Nipsy (3 yo long hair) pulling himself across the wood floor
with his front legs and I started to panic thinking that his rear legs
were paralyzed. I was already mentally driving to the emergency vet.
Then as I got up, so did he, and proceeded to walk across the floor
normally.

None of my cats have done this before but I've read about it and I
suppose this means impacted anal glands? Or at least something around
his butt itches. It looked normal and clean although a bit hard to
find through all that hair. No matting or "residue". Could be worms I
guess but that would be odd in the middle of the winter and I've
noticed nothing in the litterbox.

Oh well, I'll call the vet when they open. Inconvenient of course, but
certainly better and cheaper than dealing with the emergency vet and a
saddle clot. That scared the crap out of me until he started walking.
  #2  
Old February 6th 08, 01:43 PM posted to rec.pets.cats.health+behav
Noon Cat Nick
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Posts: 145
Default Nipsy drags his butt across the floor

dgk wrote:

I noticed Nipsy (3 yo long hair) pulling himself across the wood floor
with his front legs and I started to panic thinking that his rear legs
were paralyzed. I was already mentally driving to the emergency vet.
Then as I got up, so did he, and proceeded to walk across the floor
normally.

None of my cats have done this before but I've read about it and I
suppose this means impacted anal glands? Or at least something around
his butt itches. It looked normal and clean although a bit hard to
find through all that hair. No matting or "residue". Could be worms I
guess but that would be odd in the middle of the winter and I've
noticed nothing in the litterbox.

Oh well, I'll call the vet when they open. Inconvenient of course, but
certainly better and cheaper than dealing with the emergency vet and a
saddle clot. That scared the crap out of me until he started walking.


Dogs are more apt to scoot than are cats, but cats will do it for
several reasons. Sometimes it means there's something caught in the fur
near the anus that your consciously clean cat can't remove any other
way. (Their tongue isn't for large fecal matter. I've noticed that cats
with diarrhea won't clean themselves especially well around that area.
It can't be a particularly savory task for them under such conditions.)
But since you made an inspection, that can probably be ruled out.

Most often scooting means something wrong with the anal sacs, which
secrete a musk oil that cats use for territorial marking. It could be
any number of problems with the sacs--usually impaction, but also
inflammation, infection, or even tumors. Check his stools in the litter
box. If there are signs of diarrhea, chances are the sacs are impacted.
Normal stools will allow the sacs to expel, but loose or runny stools
can cause impaction, which the cat will treat by scooting and grooming
that area.

You're doing the smart thing by calling the vet. If there's an
underlying cause for the impaction, the scooting could continue to the
point of the sacs abscessing or rupturing. Hope you can get him in soon.
  #3  
Old February 6th 08, 02:54 PM posted to rec.pets.cats.health+behav
dgk
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,241
Default Nipsy drags his butt across the floor

On Wed, 06 Feb 2008 13:43:34 GMT, Noon Cat Nick
wrote:

dgk wrote:

I noticed Nipsy (3 yo long hair) pulling himself across the wood floor
with his front legs and I started to panic thinking that his rear legs
were paralyzed. I was already mentally driving to the emergency vet.
Then as I got up, so did he, and proceeded to walk across the floor
normally.

None of my cats have done this before but I've read about it and I
suppose this means impacted anal glands? Or at least something around
his butt itches. It looked normal and clean although a bit hard to
find through all that hair. No matting or "residue". Could be worms I
guess but that would be odd in the middle of the winter and I've
noticed nothing in the litterbox.

Oh well, I'll call the vet when they open. Inconvenient of course, but
certainly better and cheaper than dealing with the emergency vet and a
saddle clot. That scared the crap out of me until he started walking.


Dogs are more apt to scoot than are cats, but cats will do it for
several reasons. Sometimes it means there's something caught in the fur
near the anus that your consciously clean cat can't remove any other
way. (Their tongue isn't for large fecal matter. I've noticed that cats
with diarrhea won't clean themselves especially well around that area.
It can't be a particularly savory task for them under such conditions.)
But since you made an inspection, that can probably be ruled out.

Most often scooting means something wrong with the anal sacs, which
secrete a musk oil that cats use for territorial marking. It could be
any number of problems with the sacs--usually impaction, but also
inflammation, infection, or even tumors. Check his stools in the litter
box. If there are signs of diarrhea, chances are the sacs are impacted.
Normal stools will allow the sacs to expel, but loose or runny stools
can cause impaction, which the cat will treat by scooting and grooming
that area.

You're doing the smart thing by calling the vet. If there's an
underlying cause for the impaction, the scooting could continue to the
point of the sacs abscessing or rupturing. Hope you can get him in soon.



Yup, vet says bring him in for a check. Easy for him to say, I'm at
work and have to teach tonight. No chance of getting out of that one.
And they're closed tomorrow, but vet says there is a chance of abcess
so he should be seen. I'm to watch him tonight (like I wouldn't
anyway) and if I see any odd behavior I take him to the emergency
(that means more expensive) vet. Otherwise I take him in on Friday
morning.
  #4  
Old February 6th 08, 05:40 PM posted to rec.pets.cats.health+behav
Noon Cat Nick
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 145
Default Nipsy drags his butt across the floor

dgk wrote:




Yup, vet says bring him in for a check. Easy for him to say, I'm at
work and have to teach tonight. No chance of getting out of that one.
And they're closed tomorrow, but vet says there is a chance of abcess
so he should be seen. I'm to watch him tonight (like I wouldn't
anyway) and if I see any odd behavior I take him to the emergency
(that means more expensive) vet. Otherwise I take him in on Friday
morning.


Well, just notice if he repeats the behavior. If he doesn't as far as
you can tell, it might just've been a one-time thing; maybe he needed to
scratch there, and scooting was the only way he could do that. But still
keep your appt. with the vet.
  #5  
Old February 7th 08, 05:36 AM posted to rec.pets.cats.health+behav
cybercat
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Posts: 4,216
Default Nipsy drags his butt across the floor


"RobZip" wrote in message
...

"dgk" wrote in message
...
On Wed, 06 Feb 2008 13:43:34 GMT, Noon Cat Nick
Yup, vet says bring him in for a check. Easy for him to say, I'm at
work and have to teach tonight. No chance of getting out of that one.
And they're closed tomorrow, but vet says there is a chance of abcess
so he should be seen.


Good possibility. One of my tom cats recently had an abcessed anal gland
that drained to the exterior through the skin about 1/2 inch away from his
anus. He never did any scooting or excess grooming. He just turned his
backside towards me one day and there was a 1/2 inch diameter gaping
abcess with all the fur chewed away from the area. It seems to have not
bothered him until it was ready to drain, then he chewed the fur and bit
it open. A one week course of antibiotics and he was good as new - except
for the spot the vet shaved to treat the area. For some reason, poor old
Nacho got very self concious when we would tease him over his bald spot.


Another charming post from cat killer Rob. Thanks so much for posting.



--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com

  #6  
Old February 7th 08, 01:06 PM posted to rec.pets.cats.health+behav
dgk
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,241
Default Nipsy drags his butt across the floor

On Wed, 06 Feb 2008 17:40:25 GMT, Noon Cat Nick
wrote:

dgk wrote:




Yup, vet says bring him in for a check. Easy for him to say, I'm at
work and have to teach tonight. No chance of getting out of that one.
And they're closed tomorrow, but vet says there is a chance of abcess
so he should be seen. I'm to watch him tonight (like I wouldn't
anyway) and if I see any odd behavior I take him to the emergency
(that means more expensive) vet. Otherwise I take him in on Friday
morning.


Well, just notice if he repeats the behavior. If he doesn't as far as
you can tell, it might just've been a one-time thing; maybe he needed to
scratch there, and scooting was the only way he could do that. But still
keep your appt. with the vet.



He was absolutely normal, or I suppose, as normal as he ever is. I'll
have to bring him in soon though.
  #7  
Old February 7th 08, 01:40 PM posted to rec.pets.cats.health+behav
Lesley
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Posts: 3,702
Default Nipsy drags his butt across the floor

On 6 Feb, 05:23, dgk wrote:
I noticed Nipsy (3 yo long hair) pulling himself across the wood floor
with his front legs and I started to panic thinking that his rear legs
were paralyzed. I was already mentally driving to the emergency vet.
Then as I got up, so did he, and proceeded to walk across the floor
normally.


I've very occasionally seen cats do this when they get a bit of poop
stuck to their fur that they can't get off by any method other than
dragging their butt along the ground. In our household this is a cue
to grab some TP and remove the offending poop from their butt- the
things we do for them!

Lesley

Slave of the Fabulous Furballs

  #8  
Old February 7th 08, 11:54 PM posted to rec.pets.cats.health+behav
Petzl
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Posts: 165
Default Nipsy drags his butt across the floor

On Thu, 07 Feb 2008 08:06:54 -0500, dgk wrote:

On Wed, 06 Feb 2008 17:40:25 GMT, Noon Cat Nick
wrote:

dgk wrote:




Yup, vet says bring him in for a check. Easy for him to say, I'm at
work and have to teach tonight. No chance of getting out of that one.
And they're closed tomorrow, but vet says there is a chance of abcess
so he should be seen. I'm to watch him tonight (like I wouldn't
anyway) and if I see any odd behavior I take him to the emergency
(that means more expensive) vet. Otherwise I take him in on Friday
morning.


Well, just notice if he repeats the behavior. If he doesn't as far as
you can tell, it might just've been a one-time thing; maybe he needed to
scratch there, and scooting was the only way he could do that. But still
keep your appt. with the vet.



He was absolutely normal, or I suppose, as normal as he ever is. I'll
have to bring him in soon though.


While cats absolutely hate this you have tried bathing and giving
"worming Paste/pill"

Remember to rinse cat thoroughly after bath (telephone shower is best)
Cats lick themselves and can be poisoned by residue chemicals

Petzl
--
Only the Irish Leprignomes have remained aloof and their family heritage remains pure and unconfused. Gnome watchers believe that the reason for this stems from the unfortunate events that led to their expulsion from the peat bogs of Ireland in the late 1700s. It is thought that the ambitious Leprignomes encroached on the territorial boundaries of the intellectually superior Leprechauns. The Grand Legislature of Leprechauns banished the ringleaders of this audacious uprising to Australia. As a parting gesture they cast such a powerful spell on the Leprignomes that, even today, they remain too shy to associate with other gnome species.
  #9  
Old February 8th 08, 07:19 AM posted to rec.pets.cats.health+behav
Alric Knebel's Rack
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4
Default Nipsy drags his butt across the floor

On Wed, 06 Feb 2008 13:43:34 GMT, Noon Cat Nick wrote:

Most often scooting means something wrong with the anal sacs, which
secrete a musk oil that cats use for territorial marking. It could be
any number of problems with the sacs--usually impaction, but also
inflammation, infection, or even tumors. Check his stools in the litter
box. If there are signs of diarrhea, chances are the sacs are impacted.
Normal stools will allow the sacs to expel, but loose or runny stools
can cause impaction, which the cat will treat by scooting and grooming
that area.

You're doing the smart thing by calling the vet. If there's an
underlying cause for the impaction, the scooting could continue to the
point of the sacs abscessing or rupturing. Hope you can get him in soon.


****, exp;pding kat ass, ****. this ins nt good at all.
--
____________________
Alric Knebel

http://www.ironeyefortress.com/C-SPAN_loon.html
http://www.ironeyefortress.com
  #10  
Old February 8th 08, 05:29 PM posted to rec.pets.cats.health+behav
dgk
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,241
Default Nipsy drags his butt across the floor

On Fri, 8 Feb 2008 02:19:01 -0500, Alric Knebel's Rack
wrote:

On Wed, 06 Feb 2008 13:43:34 GMT, Noon Cat Nick wrote:

Most often scooting means something wrong with the anal sacs, which
secrete a musk oil that cats use for territorial marking. It could be
any number of problems with the sacs--usually impaction, but also
inflammation, infection, or even tumors. Check his stools in the litter
box. If there are signs of diarrhea, chances are the sacs are impacted.
Normal stools will allow the sacs to expel, but loose or runny stools
can cause impaction, which the cat will treat by scooting and grooming
that area.

You're doing the smart thing by calling the vet. If there's an
underlying cause for the impaction, the scooting could continue to the
point of the sacs abscessing or rupturing. Hope you can get him in soon.


****, exp;pding kat ass, ****. this ins nt good at all.



The other cats will clean up after him.
 




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