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Bret Ludwig said...(And, he should know!)



 
 
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  #1  
Old March 31st 08, 04:08 AM posted to rec.pets.cats.rescue
Bret Ludwig
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 10
Default Bret Ludwig said...(And, he should know!)

http://birdstuff.blogspot.com/2007/1...eral-cats.html

Bret Ludwig said...

I can say from experience that shooting ferals works-if done
consistently and persistently.

Ferals exist in a netherworld of neither truly wild nor domestic
existence, they depend on garbage or cat lubbers, both of which are
human in origin. Felis Domesticus does not have a wild niche in North
America at present or we would have actual wild small cats. The bobcat
is the smallest "niche" for sizes of feline here.

Burn the trash and deter or stay under the radar of the cat
lubbers, and shoot, shovel and shut up.

I've found that shooting cats is humane if you use enough gun and
organize the shoot properly. Rimfire cartridges are not adequate.
Either .223 class centerfires or pistol class ballistics cartridges at
least 30 caliber are needed. By far and away the 7.62x39 is the
cheapest round.

I've used .32 ACP in subcaliber adapters in .30 caliber rifles at
very close range with success as well as pistols.

Bury the cat carcasses deep and use quicklime if possible. I
wouldn't put it past cat lubbers to demand the DA dig up a pile after
a good slay and apply ballistic forensics to bust the horrible cat
killer, so appropriate precautions may be in order. Your biggest
source of trouble is going to be your own mouth, though (silence is
golden) or a "friend" who rolls over on you. I'd lonewolf it unless a
feral slay is 100% kosher in your state.


Posted in response to:
Tuesday, December 04, 2007
"Shoot the [Feral] Cat[s]"
Let me say right up front that I have no problem with pet cats (Felis
domesticus) and the people who own and care for them; I was once a cat
owner myself. But feral cats are another thing altogether. Feral cats
are a scourge on the landscape. Feral cats are invasive animals (being
listed by the World Conservation Union as one of the world's 100
worst) that, through their predatory habits, do significant damage to
native bird populations. Trap, neuter, and release (TNR) programs are
not the answer. They are nothing more than a public relations sham.
They merely allow individual, free-ranging cats to live out the
remainder of their normal lifespan. Meanwhile, the cats will continue
to kill native birds and other animals, even if well-fed. The solution
to the problem of roaming and unwanted stray cats is euthanasia.
Properly administered, euthanasia is completely humane. It's more
humane, in fact, than the slow and painful deaths inflicted on their
prey by feral cats.

Bruce Barcott, a contributing editor at Outside magazine, wrote an
excellent essay in the December 2, 2007 issue of the New York Times
Magazine that examines in detail both sides of the feral cat issue. A
copy of this article is available in full at David Quintana's Lost in
the Ozone blog (see Kill the Cat that Kills the Bird).

Much of the article focuses on Jim Stevenson, founder of the Galveston
Ornithological Society and "the most notorious cat killer in America,"
and the nationwide controversy he caused when he shot a feral cat that
was preying on Piping Plovers (an endangered species) near Galveston
Island. An excerpt:

Much of the controversy focuses on the nation's population of 50
to 90 million feral cats (exact figures are impossible to ascertain),
former pets and their offspring that live independent of humans. Feral
cats may not have owners, but they do have lobbyists. Alley Cat
Allies, a national organization founded by an ex-social worker named
Becky Robinson, harnesses a fierce coalition of celebrities, cat
experts and feral-cat-colony caretakers to fight for the rights of
wild cats. Her allies include Roger Tabor, a leading British
naturalist; Jeffrey Masson, the outspoken author of "The Nine
Emotional Lives of Cats" and "When Elephants Weep"; and, fittingly,
Tippi Hedren, the actress best known for starring in the 1963 Alfred
Hitchcock thriller, "The Birds." Which, as you will recall, was a film
in which Hedren spent two hours dodging attacks by murderous birds.

Both sides weighed in on Stevenson's shooting. Cat advocates
called him cruel and criminal. The blog Cat Defender ("Exposing the
Crimes of Bird Lovers") labeled him the Evil Galveston Bird Lover. The
president of the Houston Audubon Society condemned Stevenson's
"illegal methods of controlling these animals," but other bird-
watchers hailed his actions. One Texas birder, a fourth-grade science
teacher, suggested that Stevenson be given a medal for his actions.

I wouldn't go quite so far as to praise Jim Stevenson for his actions,
but I do find them to be far more ethical, humane, and ecologically
sound than those of the feral-cat lovers. Feral cats need to be
removed from the wild in a humane manner, and by "removed" I don't
mean live-trapped and relocated elsewhere.

(I would praise Jim S. He's a good man. Bret.)
  #2  
Old April 19th 08, 04:05 PM posted to rec.pets.cats.rescue
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1
Default Bret Ludwig said...(And, he should know!)

On Mar 30, 11:08*pm, Bret Ludwig wrote:
http://birdstuff.blogspot.com/2007/1...eral-cats.html

Bret Ludwig said...

* * I can say from experience that shooting ferals works-if done
consistently and persistently.

* * Ferals exist in a netherworld of neither truly wild nor domestic
existence, they depend on garbage or cat lubbers, both of which are
human in origin. Felis Domesticus does not have a wild niche in North
America at present or we would have actual wild small cats. The bobcat
is the smallest "niche" for sizes of feline here.

* * Burn the trash and deter or stay under the radar of the cat
lubbers, and shoot, shovel and shut up.

* * I've found that shooting cats is humane if you use enough gun and
organize the shoot properly. Rimfire cartridges are not adequate.
Either .223 class centerfires or pistol class ballistics cartridges at
least 30 caliber are needed. By far and away the 7.62x39 is the
cheapest round.

* * I've used .32 ACP in subcaliber adapters in .30 caliber rifles at
very close range with success as well as pistols.

* * Bury the cat carcasses deep and use quicklime if possible. I
wouldn't put it past cat lubbers to demand the DA dig up a pile after
a good slay and apply ballistic forensics to bust the horrible cat
killer, so appropriate precautions may be in order. Your biggest
source of trouble is going to be your own mouth, though (silence is
golden) or a "friend" who rolls over on you. I'd lonewolf it unless a
feral slay is 100% kosher in your state.

*Posted in response to:
Tuesday, December 04, 2007
"Shoot the [Feral] Cat[s]"
Let me say right up front that I have no problem with pet cats (Felis
domesticus) and the people who own and care for them; I was once a cat
owner myself. But feral cats are another thing altogether. Feral cats
are a scourge on the landscape. Feral cats are invasive animals (being
listed by the World Conservation Union as one of the world's 100
worst) that, through their predatory habits, do significant damage to
native bird populations. Trap, neuter, and release (TNR) programs are
not the answer. They are nothing more than a public relations sham.
They merely allow individual, free-ranging cats to live out the
remainder of their normal lifespan. Meanwhile, the cats will continue
to kill native birds and other animals, even if well-fed. The solution
to the problem of roaming and unwanted stray cats is euthanasia.
Properly administered, euthanasia is completely humane. It's more
humane, in fact, than the slow and painful deaths inflicted on their
prey by feral cats.

Bruce Barcott, a contributing editor at Outside magazine, wrote an
excellent essay in the December 2, 2007 issue of the New York Times
Magazine that examines in detail both sides of the feral cat issue. A
copy of this article is available in full at David Quintana's Lost in
the Ozone blog (see Kill the Cat that Kills the Bird).

Much of the article focuses on Jim Stevenson, founder of the Galveston
Ornithological Society and "the most notorious cat killer in America,"
and the nationwide controversy he caused when he shot a feral cat that
was preying on Piping Plovers (an endangered species) near Galveston
Island. An excerpt:

* * Much of the controversy focuses on the nation's population of 50
to 90 million feral cats (exact figures are impossible to ascertain),
former pets and their offspring that live independent of humans. Feral
cats may not have owners, but they do have lobbyists. Alley Cat
Allies, a national organization founded by an ex-social worker named
Becky Robinson, harnesses a fierce coalition of celebrities, cat
experts and feral-cat-colony caretakers to fight for the rights of
wild cats. Her allies include Roger Tabor, a leading British
naturalist; Jeffrey Masson, the outspoken author of "The Nine
Emotional Lives of Cats" and "When Elephants Weep"; and, fittingly,
Tippi Hedren, the actress best known for starring in the 1963 Alfred
Hitchcock thriller, "The Birds." Which, as you will recall, was a film
in which Hedren spent two hours dodging attacks by murderous birds.

* * Both sides weighed in on Stevenson's shooting. Cat advocates
called him cruel and criminal. The blog Cat Defender ("Exposing the
Crimes of Bird Lovers") labeled him the Evil Galveston Bird Lover. The
president of the Houston Audubon Society condemned Stevenson's
"illegal methods of controlling these animals," but other bird-
watchers hailed his actions. One Texas birder, a fourth-grade science
teacher, suggested that Stevenson be given a medal for his actions.

I wouldn't go quite so far as to praise Jim Stevenson for his actions,
but I do find them to be far more ethical, humane, and ecologically
sound than those of the feral-cat lovers. Feral cats need to be
removed from the wild in a humane manner, and by "removed" I don't
mean live-trapped and relocated elsewhere.

(I would praise Jim S. He's a good man. Bret.)


Dear Bret; Have you ever thought of SPAY?NEUTER RELEASE? It's a humane
program that allows these helpless cats to live WITHOUT OERBREEDING!
Feral cats do have a place in the ecosystem, they destroy(consume)
creatures that will over breed and eat not only your precious birds
but destroy their nests as well,.
Well in closing Bret, why not try getting involded in helping curb a
human made problem.
If you can't and you really feel the need to shoot something; go get a
glue gun and take aim at your BIG Poorly OPINIONATED GOB!
 




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