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Superflous de-worming?



 
 
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  #1  
Old October 20th 08, 12:16 PM posted to rec.pets.cats.health+behav
Stefan P.
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Posts: 2
Default Superflous de-worming?

Hi, I was just wondering if de-worming a cat that doesn't actually
demonstrate any obvious signs of infection can have any averse effects
on it's health?

Is it also possible that any future worms might have developed a
resistance toward the medication if I regularly medicate?
  #2  
Old October 20th 08, 02:34 PM posted to rec.pets.cats.health+behav
Rene S.
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Posts: 741
Default Superflous de-worming?

My question to you is, why would you need to worm a cat regularly?
Does it live outside? Has it had worms before?

Some worm medications can be quite toxic. After all, the medication
has to kill the worms but not the cat. Many medications are specific
to the kind of worm the cat has, so giving a different medications
will not kill another worm.

Best advice is to contact a veterinarian to get a dose of the proper
medication. Most likely, you'll be asked to bring in a stool sample to
check for parasites.
  #3  
Old October 20th 08, 02:54 PM posted to rec.pets.cats.health+behav
Stefan P.
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Posts: 2
Default Superflous de-worming?

Rene S. typed with one finger:

My question to you is, why would you need to worm a cat regularly?
Does it live outside? Has it had worms before?


I've taken in a stray kitten which I think is about 11-12 weeks old
(it's getting pretty cold here now, and he/she would've been likely to
have frozen to death soon). I'm in the process of worming it right now.
It'll be living indoors from now on, but I was told the other day by a
pharmacist to worm the kitten every three months.

That's why I was curious to know if this actually is a good idea, from
the cat's point of view. I feel like it would be treating something
preventively using antibiotics.

Best advice is to contact a veterinarian to get a dose of the proper
medication. Most likely, you'll be asked to bring in a stool sample
to check for parasites.


I will. Thanks for the answer.

// Stefan
  #4  
Old October 20th 08, 03:05 PM posted to rec.pets.cats.health+behav
Paul M. Cook[_2_]
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Posts: 120
Default Superflous de-worming?


"Stefan P." wrote in message
...
Hi, I was just wondering if de-worming a cat that doesn't actually
demonstrate any obvious signs of infection can have any averse effects
on it's health?

Is it also possible that any future worms might have developed a
resistance toward the medication if I regularly medicate?


My vet has done it for the cats I have taken in from the wild. That is the
only time she offers it unless there is a sign of an infection. Droncit is
safe and powerful and I have not heard of resistance issues. If a cat has
fleas, tapeworms are almost a certainty at some point. Tapeworms complete
their life cycle through fleas. You should not have to regularly medicate.
On average I have treated my cats maybe once every 2 years when I see
segments clinging to their backsides.

Paul


  #5  
Old October 20th 08, 03:35 PM posted to rec.pets.cats.health+behav
Rene S.
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Posts: 741
Default Superflous de-worming?


I've taken in a stray kitten which I think is about 11-12 weeks old
(it's getting pretty cold here now, and he/she would've been likely to
have frozen to death soon). I'm in the process of worming it right now.
It'll be living indoors from now on, but I was told the other day by a
pharmacist to worm the kitten every three months.


In some cases, a kitten/cat may need multiple doses of a de-wormer to
completely eliminate the parasites, but I have never heard of worming
every three months "just because," especially since this kitty will be
staying indoors.
  #6  
Old October 20th 08, 05:58 PM posted to rec.pets.cats.health+behav
AZ Nomad[_2_]
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Posts: 280
Default Superflous de-worming?

On Mon, 20 Oct 2008 13:16:26 +0200, Stefan P. wrote:
Hi, I was just wondering if de-worming a cat that doesn't actually
demonstrate any obvious signs of infection can have any averse effects
on it's health?


Never forget that parasite medicines are poison only slightly less poisonous to
the host as to the guest.

  #7  
Old October 20th 08, 06:14 PM posted to rec.pets.cats.health+behav
Matthew[_3_]
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Posts: 2,287
Default Superflous de-worming?


"Rene S." wrote in message
...

I've taken in a stray kitten which I think is about 11-12 weeks old
(it's getting pretty cold here now, and he/she would've been likely to
have frozen to death soon). I'm in the process of worming it right now.
It'll be living indoors from now on, but I was told the other day by a
pharmacist to worm the kitten every three months.


In some cases, a kitten/cat may need multiple doses of a de-wormer to
completely eliminate the parasites, but I have never heard of worming
every three months "just because," especially since this kitty will be
staying indoors.


a Pharmacist is not a vet. I have never heard of every three months
unless they get them again

Rule of thumb WHEN IN DOUBT CALL YOUR VET. This rule will save your furball
always

Unless the worms come back which sometimes does happens specially if you
get a flea infestation do you have to redo the medication. I live in
Florida and even though my furballs are indoors. The fleas travel on you
and it leds to them sometimes getting the tapeworms when I see them one
little pill and they are gone.

If I am correct I am sure one of the regulars will correct me if I am wrong
Advantage makes a multi formula that does ear mites heart worm tapeworms
ticks and fleas


  #8  
Old October 23rd 08, 04:30 AM posted to rec.pets.cats.health+behav
MaryL
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Posts: 2,769
Default Superflous de-worming?


"Rene S." wrote in message
...

I've taken in a stray kitten which I think is about 11-12 weeks old
(it's getting pretty cold here now, and he/she would've been likely to
have frozen to death soon). I'm in the process of worming it right now.
It'll be living indoors from now on, but I was told the other day by a
pharmacist to worm the kitten every three months.


In some cases, a kitten/cat may need multiple doses of a de-wormer to
completely eliminate the parasites, but I have never heard of worming
every three months "just because," especially since this kitty will be
staying indoors.


Agreed. My cats are indoor cats. I adopted Holly almost 13 years ago and
Duffy more than 5 years ago. Holly developed a tapeworm several years ago,
but that was the only sign of worms in either cat in all these years.
Neither cat had been outdoors prior to adoption, so that is a difference
between these two and the OP's description. I do take a fresh fecal sample
with me for their annual exams.

MaryL

  #9  
Old October 23rd 08, 09:55 PM posted to rec.pets.cats.health+behav
yngver
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Posts: 109
Default Superflous de-worming?

On Oct 20, 9:05 am, "Paul M. Cook" wrote:
"Stefan P." wrote in message

...

Hi, I was just wondering if de-worming a cat that doesn't actually
demonstrate any obvious signs of infection can have any averse effects
on it's health?


Is it also possible that any future worms might have developed a
resistance toward the medication if I regularly medicate?


My vet has done it for the cats I have taken in from the wild. That is the
only time she offers it unless there is a sign of an infection. Droncit is
safe and powerful and I have not heard of resistance issues. If a cat has
fleas, tapeworms are almost a certainty at some point. Tapeworms complete
their life cycle through fleas. You should not have to regularly medicate.
On average I have treated my cats maybe once every 2 years when I see
segments clinging to their backsides.

Paul


We adopted a stray a few years ago and even she wasn't de-wormed
because there was no evidence of any kind of parasites. I agree with
those who are saying there is no reason to regularly worm a kitten or
cat. Your vet can test for parasites and prescribe something only if
the kitten needs it. Why go through the expense and discomfort for the
kitten if there are no parasites?
-yngver
  #10  
Old October 23rd 08, 09:59 PM posted to rec.pets.cats.health+behav
Paul M. Cook[_2_]
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Posts: 120
Default Superflous de-worming?


"yngver" wrote in message
...
On Oct 20, 9:05 am, "Paul M. Cook" wrote:
"Stefan P." wrote in message

...

Hi, I was just wondering if de-worming a cat that doesn't actually
demonstrate any obvious signs of infection can have any averse effects
on it's health?


Is it also possible that any future worms might have developed a
resistance toward the medication if I regularly medicate?


My vet has done it for the cats I have taken in from the wild. That is
the
only time she offers it unless there is a sign of an infection. Droncit
is
safe and powerful and I have not heard of resistance issues. If a cat
has
fleas, tapeworms are almost a certainty at some point. Tapeworms
complete
their life cycle through fleas. You should not have to regularly
medicate.
On average I have treated my cats maybe once every 2 years when I see
segments clinging to their backsides.

Paul


We adopted a stray a few years ago and even she wasn't de-wormed
because there was no evidence of any kind of parasites. I agree with
those who are saying there is no reason to regularly worm a kitten or
cat. Your vet can test for parasites and prescribe something only if
the kitten needs it. Why go through the expense and discomfort for the
kitten if there are no parasites?



A quick shot of droncit is cheap and does not cause any discomfort for the
cat. One shot is usually all it takes.

Paul


 




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