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Blind cat adoption tips?



 
 
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  #1  
Old December 13th 06, 10:58 PM posted to rec.pets.cats.health+behav
bookie
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,049
Default Blind cat adoption tips?

dear all
i am seriously considering adopting an old cat who is blind, or rather
has had to have her eyes removed because of eye infections which woudl
not clear up. What i am wondering is how she will cope in a new house
and what i can do to make life easier for her to get about. I already
have one old-timer puss who is about 15 or 16yrs old, fairly laid back,
came from a house with other cats previously before I took her in so is
used to sharing her space although she has been an only cat for the
last 18 months with me, and I am wondering how best to approach
integrating them? any tips on this? I am worried that my old cat jessie
will not take to the new cat (mabel) and maybe bully her and mabel will
not be able to stand up for herself as she is blind and fairly
arthritic (mabel is also 16 yrs old but not nearly as spritely as
jessie puss), or do you think that jessie will be ok and not feel that
mabel is a threat because she is blind and so decrepit and will
therefore leave her alone?

I don't want to make life miserable for either of them by taking this
new one on. i wonder whether it would be better to leave mabel in the
shelter until such time that someone who doesnt' already have cats
comes along to take her home, but she has been there a long time
already and is not likely to be homed by anyone else in a hurry, what
do people think?

sensible answers only please, no stupid crap from sad ****s who don't
actually have cats but only post to this site to wind people up because
they have nothing else in their tragic little lives, you know who you
are.
cheers Bookie

  #2  
Old December 13th 06, 11:42 PM posted to rec.pets.cats.health+behav
MaryL
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,760
Default Blind cat adoption tips?


"bookie" wrote in message
oups.com...
dear all
i am seriously considering adopting an old cat who is blind, or rather
has had to have her eyes removed because of eye infections which woudl
not clear up. What i am wondering is how she will cope in a new house
and what i can do to make life easier for her to get about. I already
have one old-timer puss who is about 15 or 16yrs old, fairly laid back,
came from a house with other cats previously before I took her in so is
used to sharing her space although she has been an only cat for the
last 18 months with me, and I am wondering how best to approach
integrating them? any tips on this? I am worried that my old cat jessie
will not take to the new cat (mabel) and maybe bully her and mabel will
not be able to stand up for herself as she is blind and fairly
arthritic (mabel is also 16 yrs old but not nearly as spritely as
jessie puss), or do you think that jessie will be ok and not feel that
mabel is a threat because she is blind and so decrepit and will
therefore leave her alone?

I don't want to make life miserable for either of them by taking this
new one on. i wonder whether it would be better to leave mabel in the
shelter until such time that someone who doesnt' already have cats
comes along to take her home, but she has been there a long time
already and is not likely to be homed by anyone else in a hurry, what
do people think?

sensible answers only please, no stupid crap from sad ****s who don't
actually have cats but only post to this site to wind people up because
they have nothing else in their tragic little lives, you know who you
are.
cheers Bookie


Bookie,

I have a wonderful blind cat, Duffy. He is truly remarkable and has brought
an incredible amount of joy to our household. Duffy was approximately 5
years when I adopted him, and he has blind since birth. Like yours, he
spent several months in the shelter before I adopted him. I had some of the
same concerns you outlined, especially because I already had a cat (Holly)
who had previously been very aggressive toward any other cat in my vicinity.
She was so aggressive that we called her "the black tornado." I took a very
slow, cautious, measured approach to the introduction. In fact, I precisely
followed the advice of a friend who has had a great deal of experience in
introducing cats with different (and potentially conflicting) personalities.
It was a full 6 weeks before I left the two of them alone together at all
times. They now are a happy twosome. Depending on the personalities of
your cats, you may not need to take that much time, but it is always better
to go very slowly than to try to rush these introductions -- especially
given the circumstances you outlined.

I have previously written a fairly lengthy document on the introduction I
used. I have posted it in "bits and pieces" on this site over a period of
time, but I will be happy to email it to you if you want to read it. I am
posting links under my sig to a "pictorial history" of the introduction. In
particular, you might want to look at the temporary door we used on "Duffy's
room." That way, they could be close to each other without taking any
chances of an attack. In addition, look at the platter that I placed under
the door at meal time. Each cat was able to eat in very close proximity to
the other without actually being in the same room. Again, that was some
time into the introduction period. Incidentally, I spent a great deal of
time with Duffy during that period; I did not simply leave him alone in his
separate room. Also, I lavished loving and attention on Holly every time I
left Duffy's room because I did not want her to feel displaced and to
possibly become resentful of Duffy.

One thing I would like to emphasize is that Duffy adjusted *beautifully.*
He can do almost anything a sighted can do except run rapidly through the
house. Instead, he has his "vertical space." I have two sturdy cat trees
and some other climbing surfaces -- he loves to climb and is like a little
gymnast. I used carpeted surfaces in most instances, with only one sisal
pole on each cat tree, because he needs to be able to climb. Holly can
simply leap from one bed to another on the cat tree, but Duffy needs to be
able to use the poles for navigation.

Please fee free to contact me. And *thank you VERY much* for adopting this
kitty. (My email address attached to this message is valid except that you
first need to "take-out-the-litter.")

MaryL

Photos of Duffy and Holly: 'o'
http://tinyurl.com/8y54 (Introducing Duffy to Holly)
http://tinyurl.com/8y56 (Duffy and Holly "settle in")


  #3  
Old December 13th 06, 11:47 PM posted to rec.pets.cats.health+behav
Lesley
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,702
Default Blind cat adoption tips?


bookie wrote:
dear all
i am seriously considering adopting an old cat who is blind, or rather
has had to have her eyes removed because of eye infections


First of all a round of applause for being prepared to consider her!

Other than that I have no experience but there's someone on this
list...Forget her name but remeber she has 2 cats (like a lot of people
I remember her cats but not her name!) who has adopted Duffy who is
blind and also has Holly who is not so my contribution is keeping this
at the top of the list so I hope she will see it and reply..

Lesley

Slave of the Fabulous Furballs

  #4  
Old December 13th 06, 11:48 PM posted to rec.pets.cats.health+behav
Lesley
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,702
Default Blind cat adoption tips?


MaryL wrote:



There she is!

Lesley

Slave of the Fabulous Furballs

  #5  
Old December 13th 06, 11:58 PM posted to rec.pets.cats.health+behav
MaryL
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,760
Default Blind cat adoption tips?


"Lesley" wrote in message
ups.com...

MaryL wrote:



There she is!

Lesley

Slave of the Fabulous Furballs


Ha! I saw your earlier message. We probably sent our messages at just
about the same time. Like you, I remember the names of cats much better
than their hoomins. )

MaryL


  #6  
Old December 14th 06, 12:02 AM posted to rec.pets.cats.health+behav
bookie
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,049
Default Blind cat adoption tips?


MaryL wrote:
"bookie" wrote in message
oups.com...
dear all
i am seriously considering adopting an old cat who is blind, or rather
has had to have her eyes removed because of eye infections which woudl
not clear up. What i am wondering is how she will cope in a new house
and what i can do to make life easier for her to get about. I already
have one old-timer puss who is about 15 or 16yrs old, fairly laid back,
came from a house with other cats previously before I took her in so is
used to sharing her space although she has been an only cat for the
last 18 months with me, and I am wondering how best to approach
integrating them? any tips on this? I am worried that my old cat jessie
will not take to the new cat (mabel) and maybe bully her and mabel will
not be able to stand up for herself as she is blind and fairly
arthritic (mabel is also 16 yrs old but not nearly as spritely as
jessie puss), or do you think that jessie will be ok and not feel that
mabel is a threat because she is blind and so decrepit and will
therefore leave her alone?

I don't want to make life miserable for either of them by taking this
new one on. i wonder whether it would be better to leave mabel in the
shelter until such time that someone who doesnt' already have cats
comes along to take her home, but she has been there a long time
already and is not likely to be homed by anyone else in a hurry, what
do people think?

sensible answers only please, no stupid crap from sad ****s who don't
actually have cats but only post to this site to wind people up because
they have nothing else in their tragic little lives, you know who you
are.
cheers Bookie


Bookie,

I have a wonderful blind cat, Duffy. He is truly remarkable and has brought
an incredible amount of joy to our household. Duffy was approximately 5
years when I adopted him, and he has blind since birth. Like yours, he
spent several months in the shelter before I adopted him. I had some of the
same concerns you outlined, especially because I already had a cat (Holly)
who had previously been very aggressive toward any other cat in my vicinity.
She was so aggressive that we called her "the black tornado." I took a very
slow, cautious, measured approach to the introduction. In fact, I precisely
followed the advice of a friend who has had a great deal of experience in
introducing cats with different (and potentially conflicting) personalities.
It was a full 6 weeks before I left the two of them alone together at all
times. They now are a happy twosome. Depending on the personalities of
your cats, you may not need to take that much time, but it is always better
to go very slowly than to try to rush these introductions -- especially
given the circumstances you outlined.

I have previously written a fairly lengthy document on the introduction I
used. I have posted it in "bits and pieces" on this site over a period of
time, but I will be happy to email it to you if you want to read it. I am
posting links under my sig to a "pictorial history" of the introduction. In
particular, you might want to look at the temporary door we used on "Duffy's
room." That way, they could be close to each other without taking any
chances of an attack. In addition, look at the platter that I placed under
the door at meal time. Each cat was able to eat in very close proximity to
the other without actually being in the same room. Again, that was some
time into the introduction period. Incidentally, I spent a great deal of
time with Duffy during that period; I did not simply leave him alone in his
separate room. Also, I lavished loving and attention on Holly every time I
left Duffy's room because I did not want her to feel displaced and to
possibly become resentful of Duffy.

One thing I would like to emphasize is that Duffy adjusted *beautifully.*
He can do almost anything a sighted can do except run rapidly through the
house. Instead, he has his "vertical space." I have two sturdy cat trees
and some other climbing surfaces -- he loves to climb and is like a little
gymnast. I used carpeted surfaces in most instances, with only one sisal
pole on each cat tree, because he needs to be able to climb. Holly can
simply leap from one bed to another on the cat tree, but Duffy needs to be
able to use the poles for navigation.

Please fee free to contact me. And *thank you VERY much* for adopting this
kitty. (My email address attached to this message is valid except that you
first need to "take-out-the-litter.")

MaryL

Photos of Duffy and Holly: 'o'
http://tinyurl.com/8y54 (Introducing Duffy to Holly)
http://tinyurl.com/8y56 (Duffy and Holly "settle in")

thanks for your help, any tips are very welcome, both cats are very old
so they may just ignore each other with any luck. anyway jessie is
spending a lot of time snuggling inthe bottom of the wardrobe at
present so she may not even notice a new arrival.
if you can email me with any stuff on introductions that would be
great, i just can't leave this poor little furball inthe shelter, she
is so sweet and needs a home but all the people who go there go
straight for the fluffy kittens and younger pussies and I do not want
her to end her days there.
bizarrely enough she is also a calico just like jessie

do their other senses become heightened or is that just a myth?
B

  #7  
Old December 14th 06, 12:11 AM posted to rec.pets.cats.health+behav
MaryL
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,760
Default Blind cat adoption tips?


"bookie" wrote in message
ps.com...

MaryL wrote:
"bookie" wrote in message
oups.com...
dear all
i am seriously considering adopting an old cat who is blind, or rather
has had to have her eyes removed because of eye infections which woudl
not clear up. What i am wondering is how she will cope in a new house
and what i can do to make life easier for her to get about. I already
have one old-timer puss who is about 15 or 16yrs old, fairly laid back,
came from a house with other cats previously before I took her in so is
used to sharing her space although she has been an only cat for the
last 18 months with me, and I am wondering how best to approach
integrating them? any tips on this? I am worried that my old cat jessie
will not take to the new cat (mabel) and maybe bully her and mabel will
not be able to stand up for herself as she is blind and fairly
arthritic (mabel is also 16 yrs old but not nearly as spritely as
jessie puss), or do you think that jessie will be ok and not feel that
mabel is a threat because she is blind and so decrepit and will
therefore leave her alone?

I don't want to make life miserable for either of them by taking this
new one on. i wonder whether it would be better to leave mabel in the
shelter until such time that someone who doesnt' already have cats
comes along to take her home, but she has been there a long time
already and is not likely to be homed by anyone else in a hurry, what
do people think?

sensible answers only please, no stupid crap from sad ****s who don't
actually have cats but only post to this site to wind people up because
they have nothing else in their tragic little lives, you know who you
are.
cheers Bookie


Bookie,

I have a wonderful blind cat, Duffy. He is truly remarkable and has
brought
an incredible amount of joy to our household. Duffy was approximately 5
years when I adopted him, and he has blind since birth. Like yours, he
spent several months in the shelter before I adopted him. I had some of
the
same concerns you outlined, especially because I already had a cat
(Holly)
who had previously been very aggressive toward any other cat in my
vicinity.
She was so aggressive that we called her "the black tornado." I took a
very
slow, cautious, measured approach to the introduction. In fact, I
precisely
followed the advice of a friend who has had a great deal of experience in
introducing cats with different (and potentially conflicting)
personalities.
It was a full 6 weeks before I left the two of them alone together at all
times. They now are a happy twosome. Depending on the personalities of
your cats, you may not need to take that much time, but it is always
better
to go very slowly than to try to rush these introductions -- especially
given the circumstances you outlined.

I have previously written a fairly lengthy document on the introduction I
used. I have posted it in "bits and pieces" on this site over a period
of
time, but I will be happy to email it to you if you want to read it. I
am
posting links under my sig to a "pictorial history" of the introduction.
In
particular, you might want to look at the temporary door we used on
"Duffy's
room." That way, they could be close to each other without taking any
chances of an attack. In addition, look at the platter that I placed
under
the door at meal time. Each cat was able to eat in very close proximity
to
the other without actually being in the same room. Again, that was some
time into the introduction period. Incidentally, I spent a great deal of
time with Duffy during that period; I did not simply leave him alone in
his
separate room. Also, I lavished loving and attention on Holly every time
I
left Duffy's room because I did not want her to feel displaced and to
possibly become resentful of Duffy.

One thing I would like to emphasize is that Duffy adjusted *beautifully.*
He can do almost anything a sighted can do except run rapidly through the
house. Instead, he has his "vertical space." I have two sturdy cat
trees
and some other climbing surfaces -- he loves to climb and is like a
little
gymnast. I used carpeted surfaces in most instances, with only one sisal
pole on each cat tree, because he needs to be able to climb. Holly can
simply leap from one bed to another on the cat tree, but Duffy needs to
be
able to use the poles for navigation.

Please fee free to contact me. And *thank you VERY much* for adopting
this
kitty. (My email address attached to this message is valid except that
you
first need to "take-out-the-litter.")

MaryL

Photos of Duffy and Holly: 'o'
http://tinyurl.com/8y54 (Introducing Duffy to Holly)
http://tinyurl.com/8y56 (Duffy and Holly "settle in")

thanks for your help, any tips are very welcome, both cats are very old
so they may just ignore each other with any luck. anyway jessie is
spending a lot of time snuggling inthe bottom of the wardrobe at
present so she may not even notice a new arrival.
if you can email me with any stuff on introductions that would be
great, i just can't leave this poor little furball inthe shelter, she
is so sweet and needs a home but all the people who go there go
straight for the fluffy kittens and younger pussies and I do not want
her to end her days there.
bizarrely enough she is also a calico just like jessie

do their other senses become heightened or is that just a myth?
B


Do you know if this kitty has been blind since birth (or at least for a
number of years), or is it age-related? I think that makes a difference.
Certainly, Duffy is a truly remarkable example of what a blind cat can do.
I thought when I adopted him that I would have to be very careful never to
move furniture. In actual fact, that has not been necessary. If I move a
chair, I will find him sitting on it 5 minutes later! Nevertheless, it is
important to *start* by leaving everything in the same position so your new
kitty can learn his way around. Also, any time you put him down after
holding him, put him on the floor where he can touch a familiar piece of
furniture. That will help him become acclimated -- in other words, don't
just put him down in the middle of the room as you might with a sighted cat.
Again, that soon wasn't necessary with Duffy, but you will be able to make
that decision as you watch and see how much "awareness" your cat has.

Here are still *more* pictures of Duffy and Holly. Here you can see how
Duffy has taken over and truly made this his domain. I will also email the
document to you.

MaryL

Photos of Duffy and Holly: 'o'
Duffy: http://tinyurl.com/cslwf
Holly: http://tinyurl.com/9t68o
Duffy and Holly together: http://tinyurl.com/8b47e
Recent pics: http://tinyurl.com/clal7


  #8  
Old December 14th 06, 12:15 AM posted to rec.pets.cats.health+behav
bookie
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,049
Default Blind cat adoption tips?


MaryL wrote:
"bookie" wrote in message
ps.com...

MaryL wrote:
"bookie" wrote in message
oups.com...
dear all
i am seriously considering adopting an old cat who is blind, or rather
has had to have her eyes removed because of eye infections which woudl
not clear up. What i am wondering is how she will cope in a new house
and what i can do to make life easier for her to get about. I already
have one old-timer puss who is about 15 or 16yrs old, fairly laid back,
came from a house with other cats previously before I took her in so is
used to sharing her space although she has been an only cat for the
last 18 months with me, and I am wondering how best to approach
integrating them? any tips on this? I am worried that my old cat jessie
will not take to the new cat (mabel) and maybe bully her and mabel will
not be able to stand up for herself as she is blind and fairly
arthritic (mabel is also 16 yrs old but not nearly as spritely as
jessie puss), or do you think that jessie will be ok and not feel that
mabel is a threat because she is blind and so decrepit and will
therefore leave her alone?

I don't want to make life miserable for either of them by taking this
new one on. i wonder whether it would be better to leave mabel in the
shelter until such time that someone who doesnt' already have cats
comes along to take her home, but she has been there a long time
already and is not likely to be homed by anyone else in a hurry, what
do people think?

sensible answers only please, no stupid crap from sad ****s who don't
actually have cats but only post to this site to wind people up because
they have nothing else in their tragic little lives, you know who you
are.
cheers Bookie


Bookie,

I have a wonderful blind cat, Duffy. He is truly remarkable and has
brought
an incredible amount of joy to our household. Duffy was approximately 5
years when I adopted him, and he has blind since birth. Like yours, he
spent several months in the shelter before I adopted him. I had some of
the
same concerns you outlined, especially because I already had a cat
(Holly)
who had previously been very aggressive toward any other cat in my
vicinity.
She was so aggressive that we called her "the black tornado." I took a
very
slow, cautious, measured approach to the introduction. In fact, I
precisely
followed the advice of a friend who has had a great deal of experience in
introducing cats with different (and potentially conflicting)
personalities.
It was a full 6 weeks before I left the two of them alone together at all
times. They now are a happy twosome. Depending on the personalities of
your cats, you may not need to take that much time, but it is always
better
to go very slowly than to try to rush these introductions -- especially
given the circumstances you outlined.

I have previously written a fairly lengthy document on the introduction I
used. I have posted it in "bits and pieces" on this site over a period
of
time, but I will be happy to email it to you if you want to read it. I
am
posting links under my sig to a "pictorial history" of the introduction.
In
particular, you might want to look at the temporary door we used on
"Duffy's
room." That way, they could be close to each other without taking any
chances of an attack. In addition, look at the platter that I placed
under
the door at meal time. Each cat was able to eat in very close proximity
to
the other without actually being in the same room. Again, that was some
time into the introduction period. Incidentally, I spent a great deal of
time with Duffy during that period; I did not simply leave him alone in
his
separate room. Also, I lavished loving and attention on Holly every time
I
left Duffy's room because I did not want her to feel displaced and to
possibly become resentful of Duffy.

One thing I would like to emphasize is that Duffy adjusted *beautifully.*
He can do almost anything a sighted can do except run rapidly through the
house. Instead, he has his "vertical space." I have two sturdy cat
trees
and some other climbing surfaces -- he loves to climb and is like a
little
gymnast. I used carpeted surfaces in most instances, with only one sisal
pole on each cat tree, because he needs to be able to climb. Holly can
simply leap from one bed to another on the cat tree, but Duffy needs to
be
able to use the poles for navigation.

Please fee free to contact me. And *thank you VERY much* for adopting
this
kitty. (My email address attached to this message is valid except that
you
first need to "take-out-the-litter.")

MaryL

Photos of Duffy and Holly: 'o'
http://tinyurl.com/8y54 (Introducing Duffy to Holly)
http://tinyurl.com/8y56 (Duffy and Holly "settle in")

thanks for your help, any tips are very welcome, both cats are very old
so they may just ignore each other with any luck. anyway jessie is
spending a lot of time snuggling inthe bottom of the wardrobe at
present so she may not even notice a new arrival.
if you can email me with any stuff on introductions that would be
great, i just can't leave this poor little furball inthe shelter, she
is so sweet and needs a home but all the people who go there go
straight for the fluffy kittens and younger pussies and I do not want
her to end her days there.
bizarrely enough she is also a calico just like jessie

do their other senses become heightened or is that just a myth?
B


Do you know if this kitty has been blind since birth (or at least for a
number of years), or is it age-related? I think that makes a difference.
Certainly, Duffy is a truly remarkable example of what a blind cat can do.
I thought when I adopted him that I would have to be very careful never to
move furniture. In actual fact, that has not been necessary. If I move a
chair, I will find him sitting on it 5 minutes later! Nevertheless, it is
important to *start* by leaving everything in the same position so your new
kitty can learn his way around. Also, any time you put him down after
holding him, put him on the floor where he can touch a familiar piece of
furniture. That will help him become acclimated -- in other words, don't
just put him down in the middle of the room as you might with a sighted cat.
Again, that soon wasn't necessary with Duffy, but you will be able to make
that decision as you watch and see how much "awareness" your cat has.

Here are still *more* pictures of Duffy and Holly. Here you can see how
Duffy has taken over and truly made this his domain. I will also email the
document to you.

MaryL

Photos of Duffy and Holly: 'o'
Duffy: http://tinyurl.com/cslwf
Holly: http://tinyurl.com/9t68o
Duffy and Holly together: http://tinyurl.com/8b47e
Recent pics: http://tinyurl.com/clal7

no she was not blind since birth she had one eye removed due to an
infection, then when she went into the shelter she had to have the
other removed as it too was infected and could not be saved by the vet.
She just has 2 hollows where her lovely eyes should be, such a shame.
she has foudn her way around the centre, she lives in the reception
area not in a pen so she potters about most of the time.
haven't moved any furniture around in this house in the last 5 years of
living here so not about to start moving anything now, I'm too lazy.

  #9  
Old December 14th 06, 01:10 AM posted to rec.pets.cats.health+behav
Cheryl
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,355
Default Blind cat adoption tips?

On Wed 13 Dec 2006 07:11:08p, MaryL wrote in
rec.pets.cats.health+behav
:

Here are still *more* pictures of Duffy and Holly. Here you can
see how Duffy has taken over and truly made this his domain.


This one still completely amazes me. How he got up there without
knocking everything over is truely a tribute to his abilities.

http://www.picturetrail.com/gallery/...id=10346294 8

--
Cheryl

  #10  
Old December 14th 06, 01:22 AM posted to rec.pets.cats.health+behav
MaryL
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,760
Default Blind cat adoption tips?


"Cheryl" wrote in message
...
On Wed 13 Dec 2006 07:11:08p, MaryL wrote in
rec.pets.cats.health+behav
:

Here are still *more* pictures of Duffy and Holly. Here you can
see how Duffy has taken over and truly made this his domain.


This one still completely amazes me. How he got up there without
knocking everything over is truely a tribute to his abilities.

http://www.picturetrail.com/gallery/...id=10346294 8

--
Cheryl


Yes, I feel the same way. He got up *and* down without doing any damage at
all. Fortunately, I had finished that painting several days earlier, so it
was dry enough not to leave oil all over Duffy.

MaryL


 




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